“This is what a feminist slut looks like”: Perspectives on the SlutWalk movement

feministslut



Price: $24.95

Page Count: 250

Publication Date: April 2015

ISBN: 978-1-926452-15-9

In April 2011, a team of five people put together SlutWalk Toronto, a protest responding to slut shaming and victim blaming culture, exemplified by a recent event at Osgoode Hall Law School at York University. In the name of campus “safety,” Toronto Police Constable Michael Sanguinetti advised “women should avoid dressing like sluts in order to not be victimized.” The sentiment of those in the over 3000 person crowd that day were shared by folks around the globe — leading to over 200 SlutWalks internationally and the establishment of “SlutWalk” organizing groups. This collection engenders a critical engagement with the global phenomenon of the SlutWalk movement, considering both its strengths and limitations. The chapters take up SlutWalk through a feminist lens (broadly defined) considering SlutWalk as a successful social movement, a site of tremendous controversy, and an ongoing discussion among and between waves of feminists across the life cycle and across the globe. Through poetry, photography, scholarly articles, creative non-fiction, personal essays, the collection seeks to unpack the discursive performance of SlutWalk as well as explore the experiences of people who attended various and diverse SlutWalks marches/protests in North America and Asia.

This Is What A Feminist Slut Looks Like: Perspectives on the SlutWalk Movement is a compelling and much needed compendium that bravely and honestly addresses the difficulties and challenges of organizing global SlutWalk protests/movements. Diverse voices and perspectives of organizers, participants, and critics from North America to Hong Kong address intersectionality related to people’s location, whether associated with ability, body size, class, ethnicity, family, gender, racialization, parenting, sexuality, or experience with sexual or other forms of violence. The first of its kind, this critical collection — in the format of traditional scholarly writing, poetry, photographaphy, and an open letter — provides interwoven theoretical analysis and personal reflections that compel readers to engage with the complexity of feminist and anti-sexual violence theorizing, activism, discussion and movements. A must read for all.
—Fiona Joy Green, Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Winnipeg

This manuscript is a wonderful and nuanced analysis of the SlutWalk movement, providing neither singular endorsement nor simplified critique. The editors have effectively selected chapters that bring out the various perspectives and different contexts of the SlutWalk movement globally, thereby bringing to the forefront crucial questions regarding the future of feminism, the potential within global feminist movements such as SlutWalk, and the various inherent and inevitable challenges that occur. Overall, the manuscript is a brilliant and effective analysis of an extremely pivotal and influential movement.
—Melinda Vandenbeld Giles, Department of Anthropology, University of Toron- to, Editor, Mothering in the Age of Neoliberalism

1. Introduction
May Friedman, Andrea O’Reilly, Alyssa Teekah, Erika Jane Scholtz

2. yes, i am a slut
Clementine Morrigan

3. Caution
Nish Israni

2. Dirty Talk: A History of “Slut”
Nancy Effinger Wilson

3. Feminism Forged Through Trauma: Call-out Culture and SlutWalk
Alyssa Teekah

4. Slut Pride: A Tribute to Slutwalk
Andrea O’Reilly

5. Three Times a Lady: Images from SlutWalk Hong Kong (2011 to 2013)
Daniel Garrett

6. Third Wave, Breaking
Jacqueline Schiappa

7. “Doing Something” about “Coming Together”: The Surfacing of Intersections of Race, Sex and Sexual Violence in Victim-Blaming and in the SlutWalk Movement
Nicole Pietsch

8. Mapping the SlutWalk Paradox: Challenges and Possibilities of Using Raunch in Transnational Feminist Politics
Amanda D. Watson and Corinne L. Mason

9. This Is What A Feminist Looks Like: An Understanding Of The SlutWalk Movement Through Internet Commentary
Norah Jones and Margaret K. Nelson

10. An Open Letter to Sinéad O'Connor and Miley Cyrus, on the topic of Sluts, Constrained Choices and the Need for Dialogue
May Friedman

11. Halt! Don’t do what you want with my Body
Raushan Bhuiyan

12. Single Mothering in Rape Culture: Confronting Myths and Creating Change
Shannon Salisbury

13. Sluthood & Survival: A Reflection on the Merits of Reclamation
Tracy B. Citeroni

14. Loud, Proud, Fat Slut
Morrisa Silvert

15. SlutWalk Hong Kong: 'Western', instead of 'White Privilege'
Angie Ng

Contributor Biographies

Alyssa Teekah has organized in community and academic research spaces, working with queer Asian-Canadian filmmaker Richard Fung, the Centre for Women and Trans People at York University, and Masala Militia, a ‘brown’ feminist collective. She holds a MA in Gender Studies from the University of Toronto.

Erika Jane Scholz was one of the initial founders of the 2011 Toronto SlutWalk. She holds an MSW from the Factor-Inwentash School of Social Work at the University of Toronto.

May Friedman teaches at Ryerson University in the School of Social Work and the Graduate Program in Communication and Culture. She is absolutely passionate about popular culture and has published extensively on the topics of motherhood, fat and digital technologies.

Andrea O’Reilly is Professor in the School of Women’s Studies, director of The Motherhood Initiative, Publisher of Demeter and author of 20 books on mothehrood, including most recently Mothers, Mothering and Motherhood Across Cultural Difference: A Reader.